Search

Agreement At Sea

Agreement At Sea

The Protocol to this Agreement shall be the result of the first meeting of the Advisory Committee set up by the Agreement. Each party recognized that additional agreements could improve their effectiveness with respect to non-military vessels. In the protocol signed on 22 May 1973 in Washington, D.C, each side undertook not to carry out simulated attacks against the non-military vessels of the others. In 1968, the United States offered to conduct talks on the agreement and the Soviet Union agreed. The talks took place on 11 October 1971 in Moscow and on 17 May 1972 in Washington, D.C. The final agreement was signed at the Moscow Summit on 25 May 1972 by US Secretary of the Navy John Warner and Soviet Naval Commander of Admiral sergei Gorshkov of the Soviet Union Fleet. The agreement also provides: (1) to inform, as a general rule, three to five days in advance, of any proposed act likely to “constitute a danger to navigation or to aircraft in flight”; (2) information on incidents to be channelled through naval attach├ęs assigned to the capitals concerned; and (3) annual meetings to review the implementation of the Agreement. The Agreement between the United States and the Soviet Union on Incidents at Sea is a bilateral agreement concluded in 1972 between the United States and the Soviet Union to reduce the likelihood of a maritime incident between the two countries and, in the event of such an incident, to degenerate it. 2. Ships which meet in the vicinity of a formation of the other Party or which operate in the vicinity of a formation shall, in compliance with road traffic rules, avoid manoeuvres in a manner which would impede the development of the training. (b) auxiliaries of the Navy of the Contracting Parties, including all ships of the Navy entitled to fly the flag of the Navy if such a flag has been established by one of the Contracting Parties. This Agreement may be terminated in writing by any Party with a period of six months in respect of the other Party.

Ships and aircraft of the Parties may not commit simulated attacks by stirring cannons, rocket launchers, torpedoes and other weapons against non-military ships of the other Party, or launch or drop objects in the vicinity of non-military ships of the other Party in a manner that is dangerous to such ships or that constitutes a danger to navigation. . . .


Comments are closed.
error: Copy Protected